Search

Extremist shouted 'Allahu Akbar' as he tried to behead fellow inmate with makeshift knife

PUBLISHED: 11:10 23 July 2019 | UPDATED: 13:10 23 July 2019

The scars on David Sutton's neck 14 months after the attack. Photo: David Sutton

The scars on David Sutton's neck 14 months after the attack. Photo: David Sutton

Archant

An extremist who shouted "Allahu Akbar" as he tried to behead a fellow inmate in a Norfolk jail has been found guilty of attempted murder.

HMP Wayland Prison. Picture: Ian BurtHMP Wayland Prison. Picture: Ian Burt

Aklakur Rahman, originally from Ipswich in Suffolk, attacked fellow inmate David Sutton with an improvised bladed weapon at HMP Wayland near Thetford in Norfolk in July 2017.

His victim needed 28 stitches to the back of his neck — two of which were internal.

And prison officer Derek Walker, who stepped in, received a deep cut to his head, requiring multiple stitches and resulting in severe nerve damage.

Both are still receiving treatment for their injuries.

Derek Walker, right, a prison officer at Wayland prison, has won a bravery honour at an awards ceremony in London.Derek Walker, right, a prison officer at Wayland prison, has won a bravery honour at an awards ceremony in London.

Speaking to this newspaper last year, the inmate who fell prey to Rahman as HMP Wayland said he was in the wrong place at the wrong time.

Victim David Sutton said Rahman was supposed to be cutting his hair hours later, but he was attacked with razor blades stuck to a handle while waiting in the lunch queue.

At the time he said: "I'm on edge all the time now and I can't deal with it. I was begging to get a transfer out of there."

Mr Sutton, from Canvey Island, said: "All of a sudden I felt a hot burn on the back of my neck.

Ross Sanford, right, a prison officer at Wayland prison, has been presented with a bravery honour at an awards ceremony in London.Ross Sanford, right, a prison officer at Wayland prison, has been presented with a bravery honour at an awards ceremony in London.

"I put my hand on the back of my neck. The guy was screaming 'Allahu Akbar'.

"He got me with three blades stuck together.

"I dropped to the floor. Two people grabbed hold of him and it gave me time to get up.

"I was screaming for an officer and an officer came over to get me out, but then he pushed me back in there again. The guy then got me again on the left side of my face."

Another inmate ripped off his shirt to stem the bleeding.

He had 30 stitches in his neck and side of face and was returned to prison that night.

The two prison officers who intervened in the attack, Derek Walker and Ross Sanford, were presented with bravery awards in December last year.

Mr Walker was presented with the Royal Humane Society's bronze medal, one of its highest honours.

Mr Sanford received a Testimonial on Vellum.

Mr Walker had been the first prison guard on the scene.

He had been showing a new warden his duties before rushing forward and ordering Rahman to drop the knife.

Mr Walker then punched Rahman in the face, forcing him to drop the knife, which another prisoner threw into another room. However, Rahman retrieved it while Mr Sutton was dragged to safety.

While other staff arrived on the scene Rahman re-appeared holding another knife. Attempts were made to get this knife from him and subdue him but he struck out at Mr Walker who lost consciousness after receiving a knife slash to the back of the head.

Mr Sanford then clubbed Rahman with a baton.

A few days later, at HMP Lincoln, 32-year-old Rahman lunged at the neck of a prison officer with a sharpened piece of wall masonry.

In a third attack — this time at HMP Wakefield a few weeks later in August — a prison officer received a cut to his neck with a screw.

Rahman was found guilty of two counts of attempted murder for the attacks at HMP Wayland, one count of attempted murder at GMP Lincoln, and grievous bodily harm with intent at HMP Wakefield, at Lincoln Crown Court on Monday.

He was remanded in custody until sentencing at a later date.

Detective inspector Kevin Brown, from the East Midlands Special Operations Unit, said: "Aklakur Rahman was dogged in his determination to kill in these attacks. All four of his victims received severe cuts to the head or neck area and required hospital treatment - not to mention the untold psychological trauma of such violence."

Mr Walker added: "My life has not been the same since Rahman assaulted me on that day in July 2017. He took away my confidence and has left me with physical and mental scars I will have for the rest of my life. The incident has had a traumatic effect on not only on my life but on the lives of my loved ones, whom I will be forever grateful to for helping me through some dark periods."

Most Read

Comments have been disabled on this article.

Most Read

Latest from the Fakenham and Wells Times

Hot Jobs

Show Job Lists