Maltings director who helped supply malt for 100 billion pints retires

Rob Moody of Crisp in Maris Otter barley field in Norfolk

Rob Moody of Crisp in Maris Otter barley field in Norfolk. - Credit: Red Flame Communications

If you have enjoyed a Norfolk ale or beer over the past 37 years, chances are Rob Moody played a part.

Mr Moody, craft brewing and logistics director at Crisp Malt, Great Ryburgh, is retiring after 37 years’ work in the industry.

During his almost four decades he has been involved with the supply of around 6.5 million tonnes of malt - enough to produce an incredible 100 billion pints of beer or nine billion bottles of whisky.

“That’s a crazy number of pints and drams,” he said.

“It’s great to think how many people have over the years been sampling the taste of Norfolk as they sip. Barley grown and malted in this region really is special, which is why it is in such demand from brewers and distillers.


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“It’s been a privilege to work with so many fantastic people over the years and I’m sad not to be getting together with the team to thank them all in person.”

Crisp Maltings Gt Ryburgh Photo by Simon Finlay Photography

Rob Moody in Crisp's Floor Maltings. - Credit: Simon Finlay Photgraphy

Mr Moody's career began in Diss in 1984, following in his dad’s footsteps by joining Guinness at its Beaven’s floor maltings. Ten years later, the owners closed the site and he joined Crisps.

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In July 2002, Crisp bought a disused malting in Alloa in the south-east of Scotland. He was sent north with the instruction to get the place up and running again.

He was set a production target of 1,000 tonnes of malt within less than four months. It was a big ask – but one he succeeded in.

Tour of Crisp Maltings, Great Ryburgh. Picture: Ian Burt

Tour of Crisp Maltings, Great Ryburgh. Picture: Ian Burt - Credit: IAN BURT

A year later, he came back to Norfolk to help restructure Crisp’s head office. He set up a ‘central services unit’ and improved planning to ensure 365 days a year malt production.

When Anglia Maltings acquired Crisp in 2005, Mr Moody was appointed as a director, with responsibility for logistics.

“It was a professional reason and a personal excuse for sampling a wide range of beers – and enjoying the huge range of flavours and styles that are made with our malts," he said.

Rob Moody of Crisp at the firm's floor maltings in Great Ryburgh. Red Flame Communications

Rob Moody of Crisp at the firm's floor maltings in Great Ryburgh. Red Flame Communications - Credit: Red Flame Communications

Adrian Dyter, Crisp’s managing director said, “I would like to thank Rob for his passion and commitment, as well as for his skills and knowledge. 

"He has definitely helped to make the company what it is today; he’s been a truly excellent colleague, and we will all miss him."

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