'Good Ole' Norfolk Gal' recounts her 52-year career as a carer in book

Sandra Adcock holds a copy of her book, Good Ole' Norfolk Gal

Sandra Adcock from Stibbard has published Good Ole' Norfolk Gal, a memoir of her time as a carer in rural Norfolk - Credit: Sonya Duncan

A woman is recalling the ‘good old days’ of her 52-year career as a carer in her new book.

Sandra Adcock from Stibbard has published Good Ole' Norfolk Gal, a memoir of her time as a carer in rural Norfolk.

With all proceeds of sales going to Fakenham medical practice asthma clinic. Mrs Adcock lost her 30-year-old son in 1995 to a severe asthma attack.

The 73-year-old started caring aged just 19, for her neighbour in Stibbard. Since then she has worked across the county, carrying out everything from in-home care, to end of life care.

Sandra Adcock, a retired carer in her 70s holding her book

Sandra Adcock started caring at just 19, for her neighbour in Stibbard. Since then she has worked across the county. - Credit: Sonya Duncan

Starting in 1967, she recalls what her job looked like when she first started.


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“Back then, home help was like fetching water out of the well, chopping wood for their fires and going down the bottom of the garden and collecting crops,” she said.

“I used to do a 12-mile radius around the village in all weathers. Some places you had to go down the dirt track, and no street lights, trying to find places in the dark was a nightmare.

Sandra Adcock, a retired carer in her 70s smiles for the camera

Sandra Adcock from Stibbard has published Good Ole' Norfolk Gal, a memoir of her time as a carer in rural Norfolk. - Credit: Sonya Duncan

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She decided to write the book after giving into her friend’s request for writing one.

“It is an eye-opener, these are all true stories and the characters are people I have looked after throughout my life.

She retired last year and with time on her hands, she wanted to look back on her life and tell people about the characters she met every day.

“I would do it all again, I loved the job,” she said.

“I feel privileged as I was doing something I loved so much. It was a privilege to look after them.

“I found it is so interesting, you never know what you could walk into. It is not something you can get a degree in, it all comes from within.”

Sandra Adcock is retiring after over 50 years as a reablement support worker, she's pictured with he

Sandra Adcock with her last clients on her final round Reginald and Evelyn Ramuz when she retired last year. - Credit: Sonya Duncan

Despite being retired, she still is caring for people who requested her to look after them.

“They said, ‘Oh please Sandra come and look after me’, and I couldn't say no, but they are the only two,” she said.

“It gets me out of the house and it suits me fine.”

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