Mid-Norfolk breweries were hearing about CO2 shortages "several weeks ago"

David and Rachel Holliday at The Norfolk Brewhouse. Picture: Norfolk Brewhouse

David and Rachel Holliday at The Norfolk Brewhouse. Picture: Norfolk Brewhouse - Credit: Archant

A Norfolk brewery has allayed any fears their stock will run out due to the ongoing carbon dioxide shortages.

The current CO2 shortages are having effects across the country, with many industries facing consequences from the lack of gas.

Carbon dioxide is what gives the beer that refreshing sensation, both in making it and when the pints are pulled at your local.

David Holliday, owner of Norfolk Brewhouse in Hindringham, which produces Moon Gazer ales and beers, said they should avoid any issues with the shortages as they have enough cylinders to cover for the next three weeks.

By this time, more CO2 should be available following the government’s announcement of a new short term arrangement with CF Fertilisers, the country's main CO2 provider.

Rachel and David Holliday, of the Norfolk Brewhouse. Pic: EDP

Rachel and David Holliday, of the Norfolk Brewhouse. Pic: EDP - Credit: Archant


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 Mr Holliday said the industry was hearing rumours of shortages for several weeks.

“I know it’s difficult at the moment, but brewers have been talking about it for weeks so why hasn’t the government?” he said.

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“Around four or five weeks ago, we were hearing tales that pubs were not getting CO2 full orders. They ordered four canisters and only three appeared.

“This has not happened in the last week or two, it has been bubbling under the surface for quite a while.”

The brewery only produces one lager that relies on the use of CO2 to create it, the Dew Hooper.

Duration Brewery. Picture: Mark Newton Photography

Duration Brewery. Picture: Mark Newton Photography - Credit: Mark Newton Photography

However, one Norfolk brewery that relies heavily on carbon dioxide is Duration in King's Lynn.

Hamish Cross, production manager, said shortages were being seen eight weeks ago, as they struggled to get hold of the gas.

They rely on it drastically, as all their drinks need CO2, with 70pc of their sales coming from ‘small packs’, selling beers in cans.

They said they are yet to see the effects of this shortage, as due to the volume they use, they have a month’s supply of CO2 at its brewery.

Mr Cross added: “It would depend on the shortages, but if it was to go into the worst-case scenario it could stop a lot of breweries our size."

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