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More reed beds and ponds at reserve

PUBLISHED: 09:33 16 April 2009 | UPDATED: 10:47 07 July 2010

An extra five acres of reed beds and ponds have been created for the sensitive wildlife living at Sculthorpe Moor Nature Reserve.

Diggers and dumpers began work in snow and sleet shortly after Christmas to begin the project, which is part of a 50-year national scheme to increase the number of ponds and bring clean water back into natural landscapes.

An extra five acres of reed beds and ponds have been created for the sensitive wildlife living at Sculthorpe Moor Nature Reserve.

Diggers and dumpers began work in snow and sleet shortly after Christmas to begin the project, which is part of a 50-year national scheme to increase the number of ponds and bring clean water back into natural landscapes.

Conservationists have scraped off dead vegetation and added new drains to create suitable habitats for bog plants, water voles, dragonflies, hobbies, warblers, cuckoos and marsh harriers.

The work was part-funded by Natural England, one of the partners in the Million Ponds Project, launched in February.

David Weaver, Natural England's land management and conservation advisor for east Norfolk and the Broads, said: “This project is in an ideal location and will contribute to sustaining nationally important wetland habitats and wildlife and improving their resilience to climate change. Natural England is keen to support the creation of these reed beds and ponds and view this as a valuable addition to what is already a terrific site.”

The 50-acre reserve in the upper Wensum valley was opened in 2003 and is managed by the Hawk and Owl Trust, which celebrates its 40th anniversary this year.

It is a Site of Special Scientific Interest (SSSI) consisting of reed bed, valley fen, alder carr and woodland with a rich diversity of plants and animals.

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