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’I want to push myself like she did’ - man to run London Marathon in sister’s memory

PUBLISHED: 14:10 01 March 2020 | UPDATED: 14:41 01 March 2020

Oliver Corri is running in memory of his sister Phoebe Ormerod-Goss who died at the age of 24 from a rare cancer. Picture: Oliver Corri

Oliver Corri is running in memory of his sister Phoebe Ormerod-Goss who died at the age of 24 from a rare cancer. Picture: Oliver Corri

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A Norfolk man will push himself to his limits as he takes on the London Marathon in memory of his sister who died from a rare form of cancer.

Oliver Corri is running in memory of his sister Phoebe Ormerod-Goss who died at the age of 24 from a rare cancer. Picture: Oliver CorriOliver Corri is running in memory of his sister Phoebe Ormerod-Goss who died at the age of 24 from a rare cancer. Picture: Oliver Corri

Oliver Corri's sister, Phoebe, died aged 24 in January 2019 after being diagnosed with retroperitoneal sarcoma.

Mr Corri is £700 short of his £3,000 total in aid of Sarcoma UK, which funds research, provides information and support.

The 33-year-old said: "I want to push myself to my physical and emotional limits, just as Phoebe did every single day that she was ill.

"I like to think that Phoebe didn't lose her fight against sarcoma - she just passed the baton on to me. It's time for my leg of the relay."

Oliver Corri is running in memory of his sister Phoebe Ormerod-Goss who died at the age of 24 from a rare cancer. Picture: Oliver CorriOliver Corri is running in memory of his sister Phoebe Ormerod-Goss who died at the age of 24 from a rare cancer. Picture: Oliver Corri

He paid tribute to his 'kind, compassionate and gentle' youngest sibling who loved animals.

During her diagnosis, Phoebe underwent a 10-hour operation, which required two teams of doctors - one flown from outside of the UK - to remove a tumour around the size of a beach ball from her abdomen.

Mr Corri, who lives in Whissonsett with his partner Holly, said he was 'blown away by her courage' as the operation left her with scars, missing ribs and decimated stomach muscles.

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Mr Corri, a data manager at Hellesdon High School, said: "Phoebe was the most remarkable person I have ever known, and she will remain an inspiration to me for the rest of my life.

"What I hadn't appreciated until she became ill was just how tough Phoebe was. I was blown away by her courage.

"She held it together while the rest of us fell apart.

"She didn't complain. She didn't crumble.

"Even when the sarcoma returned and we found out that she wouldn't recover, Phoebe never let it crush her indomitable spirit."

Sarcoma makes up around 1.3pc - around 5,300 - of cancer diagnoses in the UK each year.

Mr Corri said: "I think Phoebe would think I was crazy to be taking on the London Marathon. She would understand just how much of a challenge this is for me.

"It's going to be an emotional moment when, and if, I cross that finish line."

Visit here to donate to his page.


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