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Woman diagnosed with cancer on day her dad died offering support to others

PUBLISHED: 16:21 29 September 2020

Tracey and Andy Brasier with his father, Tony. Picture: Tracey Brasier

Tracey and Andy Brasier with his father, Tony. Picture: Tracey Brasier

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A woman is hoping to offer support to people dealing with cancer after surviving “the toughest six months you can think of.”

Tracey hosted a Macmillan coffee morning to raise money for the charity in Fakenham. Picture: Tracey BrasierTracey hosted a Macmillan coffee morning to raise money for the charity in Fakenham. Picture: Tracey Brasier

Tracey Brasier, 50, from West Raynham, near Fakenham, has been told she is in remission after a kidney cancer operation in July.

She is hosting her second Macmillan coffee morning on October 1 to help raise money for the charity who has been there for her family.

Over the last six months, the mother of two lost her dad, David and father-in-law Tony, and had to go alone to have her cancer treatment.

She lost her dad on the same day she was diagnosed.

Tracey and Andy Brasier with her parnets David and Jean. Picture: Tracey BrasierTracey and Andy Brasier with her parnets David and Jean. Picture: Tracey Brasier

“It didn’t sink in, I was diagnosed and my dad passed away,” she said.

“On the Sunday we waved him away in the ambulance, and on the Tuesday he passed away.

“I thought ‘I’m going to fight this because I don’t want to leave my mum or my kids.’

“Five weeks after my diagnosis, we lost Tony, my father-in-law. We lost two dads and half a kidney.

Tracey hosted a Macmillan coffee morning to raise money for the charity in Fakenham.. Picture: Tracey BrasierTracey hosted a Macmillan coffee morning to raise money for the charity in Fakenham.. Picture: Tracey Brasier

“It was the roughest six months you can think of.”

She is hosting the coffee morning in the hope of helping those who are living with cancer. She said it has been very difficult to offer that same support with the Covid restrictions.

“It does not have the same atmosphere”, she said.

“You can’t sit down and have a chat or even have a laugh or reminisce with someone about a loved one, you cannot do that because you have to be two metres apart and only six people can be in the room.

Tracey Brasier with her two children Ryan and Jemma Shackcloth and Andy's two children Jamie and Liam brasier. Pictre: Tracey BrasierTracey Brasier with her two children Ryan and Jemma Shackcloth and Andy's two children Jamie and Liam brasier. Pictre: Tracey Brasier

“Covid has taken all the personal touches away.”

Mrs Brasier mentioned how the coffee mornings allowed people to chat with someone as it might be difficult to talk with your family members.

She is hoping to host more coffee mornings next year.

At the moment she is putting herself on a Facebook page to offer support to those suffering from kidney cancer.

However, she said this does not have the same personal touch.

“It is not the same as seeing them face to face, and you can’t give a hug,” she said.

“That’s all you want to do, give them a hug and tell them things are going to get better, but you can’t and that really hurts.”


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